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The Inforce APL has had a growing following over the last couple of years.  It was one of the first pistol-mounted lights to use a single CR123a instead of the side-by-side lights that radically increased the width of your blaster, and it used a radically different switching system than its competition.  Early models did have some issues; mounts were a little suspect, although Inforce provided good warranty support despite laying most of the blame on user error (which, as users, we admit was possible.)

Now they’re back with a 200 lumen model that retains the easy ambidextrous switching of the original, with a more robust mounting setup.  What’s the verdict?  Overall, this is a very good light, and there are a bunch of reasons to consider it if you’re looking to mount a light on your bullet hose.

Inforce APLThe narrower profile of the single battery case makes for a much flatter gun.  That might not matter to you and you might want the retina-frying 500+ lumen lights that some companies are making now.  But if you’re, say, a plainclothes police officer, and you need to conceal a pistol with a light on it, that size advantage is considerable.

It’s also worth mentioning that 200 lumens is a lot of light.  The beam throws a bit of a spotlight but the spill of the beam is decent and you can light up a dark room by bouncing the light off the floor pretty easily.  That’s an important consideration because you definitely don’t want to be muzzling everything in the room just to look around.

The switching system is pretty good.  The ambidextrous paddles are nice for left or single handed use, and they’re easy to lock out for transport.

Our only complaint would be that we like momentary-only lights for shooting.  But it’s pretty easy to avoid switching this to constant-on, and everything else is good enough that we’re ready give an Inforce APL to our tactical teachers for Christmas.

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